Click here to print this page

Planning Retirement Online

Glass Painting - Beginner's Guide

 

Beginners Guide to Glass Painting - Part 2

Click here if you haven't yet read Beginner's Guide to Glass painting - Part 1

trace the picture with outliner

trace the picture with outliner

As outliner can blob easily, wipe the nozzle regularly on a piece of kitchen paper as you work to keep it clean. You are sure to be wobbly but don't worry. Either forget about the odd mistake as it is usually not noticed once the painting is finished, or wait until the outline is dry and then use a small craft knife to scrape off any blobs before repeating that section of the line with fresh outliner.

Picture transferred onto glass

Picture transferred onto glass

The outliner works just like lead in stained glass and separates each coloured section. Leave it to dry for several hours as it MUST be completely dry before you start painting or the black or coloured outliner will mix with your colours.

Once the outliner is dry, you can happily paint using different colours in next-door sections as the outliner will act as the perfect barrier. The lines you have drawn must be complete, though, without any breaks or the paint in a new section will find any gaps and will mix with paint already used in neighbouring sections.

Start filling sections with colour

Start filling sections with colour

Using the paints is different to normal painting as they are quite thick. If you have first outlined a part of your picture, you need to drop in enough glass paint to pool and fill the area and then (rather like spreading honey) use a brush to push it to the edges so that you make sure there are no thin sections or gaps left between outline and the main areas of your picture.

Continue with more colours

Continue with more colours

As the paints don't run easily, you will also need to use your brush to 'encourage' two different colours to mix if you want a gradient effect. Keep going until you have a finished picture and leave it to dry completely before using the object or cutting out the acetate.

Fish painted on glass

For durable objects, use glass paints that can be baked and heat your object in the oven as instructed. It should then withstand hand or even dish-washing.

your picture on a plate

your picture on a plate

 

Click below to return to

Beginners Guide to Glass Painting - Part 1

Back to Crafts section main page

Back to Laterlife Today

Visit our Pre-retirement Courses section here on laterlife or our dedicated Retirement Courses site

Bookmark This Share on Facebook Receive more like this
Bookmark


Advertise on laterlife.com



LaterLife Travel Insurance in Association with Avanti