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Art Masterclass - 69

 

June 2012

 

Rustic doorwayFrom The Artist, the monthly magazine for amateur and semi-professional painters, giving practical instruction in painting and drawing in watercolour, pastels and oils, as well as news of art events, exhibitions and competitions open to leisure artists; www.painters-online.co.uk

 


 


 

 

How to Paint The Rustic Doorway on This Month's Front Cover

 

By Terry Harrison

To paint this month's front cover image you will need:

  Rustic door

  
Surface:

Canvas board 12x8in. (30.5x20cm)

Brushes:

Half Rigger
Medium detail brush (No. 6 Round)
½in. old bristle brush

Acrylics:

Raw sienna
Burnt sienna
Yellow ochre
Cadmium red
Cadmium yellow
Permanent rose
Cobalt blue
Hooker’s green
Pale olive green

Miscellaneous:

Texture paste
Glaze medium
Palette knife
Sawdust
Eggshells
2B pencil

 

step 1

 

Step 1

Using a 2B pencil, draw the doorway and steps onto the canvas board.

 

 

 

 

 

 

step 2

Step 2

1. Using an old bristle brush apply a thick layer of glaze medium over the entire wall, the side of the steps and the foreground.
2. Scatter the eggshells over the glaze-covered wall and using the bristle brush move the shells into place.
3. Sprinkle sawdust over the eggshells and the remaining wall area.

 

 

 

Step 3

 

Step 3

1. Using the palette knife, carefully coat the door and steps with a layer of texture paste.
2. Using the tip of the knife, score grooves down the wet texture paste on the door.

 

 

 

 

 

Step 4

Step 4

1. Using the same bristle brush, cover the wall, steps and foreground with a mix of raw sienna and white, adding burnt sienna to vary the tone and mix. This is dragged and scumbled over the uneven surface to suggest a rustic finish.
2. The door and window frame are given the rustic look with a coat of cobalt blue mixed with white. Paint raw sienna on the door in places to suggest a weathered area.

 

 

 

step 5Step 5

1. The recess of the door and window are in shade, as are the risers on the flight of steps. The shadow colour is a mix of permanent rose and cobalt blue, with a dash of burnt sienna to tone it down.
2. The shadow mix is also used on the walls. Use the half Rigger to outline some of the stonework and detail on the door.

 


Step 6

Step 6

1. Paint the foliage of the pot plant and the climbing rose next, using a mix of Hooker’s green and pale olive green. Paint directly on top of the texture on the wall to give the foliage a textured finish.
2. Add the flowerpot with a mix of burnt sienna and white.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 7Step 7

1. Paint the dappled shadows of the rose, the pot and the doorway using the same shadow mix and the medium detail brush.
2. Add the hinges and doorknob with burnt umber.
3. The dappled shadows of the climbing rose are cast over the door; these are painted using a slightly bluer mix of the shadow colour.
4. The detail on the door hinges and handle are added with the half Rigger; the handrail on the steps is painted using the medium detail brush.
5. Finally, paint the flower heads, which will bring colour and interest to the painting. Mix the colours straight from the tube and avoid diluting with water. Place the thick bright coloured paint on top of the dark foliage.
Rustic Doorway, acrylic on canvas board,
(30.5x20cm)

Many of Terry’s books, including 'Painting Acrylic Landscapes the Easy Way', are available at discounted prices from Painters’books

Meet Terry at Patchings Art, Craft and Design Festival, Nottinghamshire (14-17 June 2012) and see more of his work on his website: www.terryharrison.com

If you complete this painting of a rustic doorway why not  send a copy to us to feature in a special portfolio in the gallery?

Subscribe to Leisure Painter today to read all of Terry's future articles


 


 

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