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Planning Retirement Online

Curiosity and age: A new research study

What exactly is curiosity? It’s about seeking out new information because you want to, rather than feeling that you have to. This can be manifest in an infant crawling behind a sofa to investigate a sound, in a scientist pondering the solution of an intractable problem, or simply in the act of searching for a fact on Google because it seems interesting.

There are many kinds of curiosity now recognised: interpersonal curiosity is directed towards other people, intrapersonal curiosity is directed towards oneself, perceptual curiosity is directed towards things that we see and hear, and epistemic curiosity is directed towards the world of ideas and knowledge. Little research has been done to explore how these different forms of curiosity relate to age and if they relate to being happy. A number of studies with younger adults suggest that individuals with higher levels of curiosity show higher levels of overall wellbeing and lower levels of depression and anxiety, but does this hold true of older adults? We don’t know yet!

There is still much to learn about curiosity and about whether stereotypes hold true. Are you less curious than you used to be? Or more so? Or has the focus of your curiosity merely changed?

Contribute 20 minutes of your time to science - Please help us out by completing our research study on curiosity across the lifespan. The survey takes about 20 minutes to complete, and is anonymous.

More information is to be found after clicking the link below:
https://greenwichuniversity.eu.qualtrics.com/

We will post our findings on Laterlife.com later in the year.

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