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Planning Retirement Online

Diet Supplements and Nutrition

This section contains the extensive Indexes for Food of the Month as well as health articles concerned with Natural Remedies, followed by an assortment of Health Food articles.

Check out our other Health Indexes:
Exercise & Looking Good
The A-Z of Health Conditions, Illnesses & Ailments
Health Articles Archive

Cut MangoFood of the Month

An A - Z listing of every Food Of The Month article published. A great way to see what new foods you can add to your menu and how they can help your health.

 

Anchovies
They are a bit like Marmite! You either love anchovies or can’t stand them. But are they good for you? They can taste very salty which indicates they might not be a healthy food at all.

Apples
Apples are just brilliant in helping to keep us fit and healthy.

Asparagus
Apart from its decorative looks and good flavour, asparagus is actually packed with great nutrition.

Aubergines
Lots of research has been done into aubergines, and now we know that it makes sense to include them fairly regularly in a diet because they are packed with lots of great nutrients.

Bananas
Bananas are a great source of energy

Baobob
Superfoods are everywhere - but not this superfood! We are talking about fruit powder from the baobab tree

Barley
Barley is a member of the grass family and is such a normal part of our everyday life that few of us give it any consideration at all.

Beetroot
Beetroot is a very good source of a wide range of useful antioxidants and nutrients

Blackberries
Blackberries are so good for you that they are often included in the range of foods known as “super fruits” .

Blood Oranges
They are not grown all over the world or available all year round because they rely on specific weather to develop their vivid red colour. The colour is due to the compound anthocyanin; the darker the orange the more anthocyanin it contains.Anthocyanin has long been recognised as a useful substance in health.  Some research has indicated that anthocyanins appear to improve cholesterol levels and blood sugar metabolism as well as fight oxidative stress, a process known to play a role in heart disease.

Blue Tomatoes
Blue tomatoes? Sounds like a step too far doesn’t it? After all, tomatoes are bright red and have been part of our normal diet since childhood.

Brussels Sprouts
Not a sexy food, but what a lot of nutrition in a small green ball!

Cabbage
Today we know that not only can cabbage be turned into a fabulous tasty vegetable, but it is also a health food.

Cauliflower
Because they are not a green vegetable, cauliflowers are often overlooked for their health benefits, but benefits there certainly are, and in large quantities too!

Celeriac
As a child, most of us will have been familiar with celery. But times move on and today when you go past the veggie aisle in the supermarkets you will not only see celery but also celeriac. At this time of year celeriac will be coming into its prime, so it is worth knowing a little bit about it.

Celery
Apart from being packed with goodness, celery only has around two calories per stick, so when you are struck by hunger, nibbling a celery stick could be the perfect answer.

Cheese
No, we don’t want to eat too much “bad” fat; no, we don’t want to eat too much salt.

Cherries
Despite their size, cherries do seem to contain a number of additional benefits that can help various health problems

Chickpeas
They are useful in a range of foods from curries to salads, but one main advantage of chickpeas is that they are good for you.

Chocolate
Yes, right! I know what you are thinking, chocolate and health can't go together. In fact, it seems they can.  

Coconut water and coconuts
One of the latest health foods to hit the news is coconut water, now being dubbed as nature’s sports drink.

Comfrey
Comfrey has also been known for centuries as invaluable in the treatment of various ailments including wounds, sprains, bruises and even broken bones

Crab
It is the time to start thinking about fresh crab which will give the very best flavour and texture.

Cranberries
Cranberries are a power source of vitamin C, a natural antioxidant that can help to block some of the damage caused by free radicals.

Curly kale
This lovely green vegetable is available practically everywhere, so there is no excuse for any of us to ignore its wonders!

Dates
Whatever type of date you choose, they all contain useful nutrition. In fact, if it were not for the very high sugar levels (which make them so tasty!) dates would really be very good for us. The good news is they contain no fat and no cholesterol but instead are packed with a range of good minerals and vitamins.

Duck
Duck contains good levels of omega 3 fats plus vitamin B3 (niacin), vitamin D, vitamin E and selenium, together with some iron, zinc and copper.

Elderberries
Elderberries are full of natural goodness such as Vitamins A, B and C and also contain strong antioxidant properties

Feta
With spring well on its way and summer just around the corner, our thoughts turn to salads and interesting lighter meals.

Figs
If the fig was discovered today, it would be hailed as a fabulous new food…with a naturally sweet and scented flavour and packed full of great nutrients. But because figs have been in the shops all our lives, they are not always given the appreciation they deserve.

Gooseberries
Gooseberries are really healthy little fruits. Like blackberries, they have high amounts of phenolic phytochemicals - these include the flavones and anthocyanins you have probably heard of.

Globe artichokes
In the last few weeks shops have been full of globe artichokes. These funny plants are growing steadily in popularity because of their excellent nutritional qualities, but they are also very tasty and fun to eat.

Kiwi Fruit
Now most good shops will stock these little green fruit that are hugely popular not just for their lovely mixed sweet and sour flavour, but also because they are recognised as one of the most nutritious fruits you can buy.

Lamb
Today, with good quality lamb available right across the UK; everyone can benefit from the taste and nourishment from this very traditional British food.

Lemons
Don't be a lemon about lemons! Because of the sour taste, many people think they must be really acid and so therefore not a good thing to drink neat.

Lentils
Lentils have an exceptionally high level of protein, about a third of the calories they supply are from proteins which include certain essential amino acids.

Lettuce
Lettuce? A health food? We all know that lettuce is pretty well nothing, no real flavour, no substance, no goodness.

Liquorice
Some claim it's good for you, others quite the opposite!

Lychees
With Chinese New Year approaching, consider the benefits of this popular Chinese fruit.

Mangoes
With so many people travelling to far flung places, mangoes are no longer considered the exotic fruit they were just a decade or so ago

Manuka honey
Manuka honey only comes from New Zealand, where manuka bushes grow.

Milk
Today much of our milk is homogenised as well as pasteurised. Homogenised milk undergoes a special process to break up the fat globules in the milk so that they are spread evenly through the milk. With homogenised milk, you won’t get that layer of cream at the top of the bottle or carton.

Mushrooms
Once you start learning more about mushrooms, it is amazing the variety that is available. It is also exciting to realise that is really is quite easy to go out and forage for your own mushrooms.

Noodles
Stir fry is such a normal item on menus today that is hard to believe that when many of us were kids, this didn’t feature at all in normal family meals, or even in general restaurants. Today of course stir fry is a hugely popular meal, featuring all sorts of ingredients but usually based around noodles.

Nuts
Nuts are good for us. They have had a bad name in some quarters because they contain a lot of fat, but these fats are mainly unsaturated and especially monounsaturated fats which can be good for our health because they weed out bad cholesterol and help maintain good cholesterol.

Oats
Oats are really good at filling us up without too much calorie overload and preventing us snacking on less healthy foods. One cup of plain whole grain cooked oats will have around 147 calories and lots of useful fibre.

Olives
They have of course been extremely popular in mediterranean countries for centuries, and olives are a key component in the “healthy” Mediterranean diet. But what is it that makes them healthy?

Papaya
Recent media reports have been mentioning papaya as a new super fruit

Partridge
Recent media reports have been mentioning papaya as a new super fruit

Pears
Pears are surprisingly nutritious and they also release their energy slowly, which is excellent for maintaining blood sugar levels.

Pecan nuts
One of the main reasons for the increasing popularity of pecan nuts is evidence of their excellent nutritional qualities.

Pheasant
Pheasants are full of protein and also contain lots of other good nutrients. They provide iron and zinc, contain significant levels of B vitamins and also good levels of potassium, an important mineral which works with calcium to help bone strength and promote efficient metabolism.

Pickled Vegetables
Pickling is a great way to preserve an abundance of summer and autumn vegetables for seasons when fresh produce is less available. It is thought to have begun around 4000 years ago using cucumbers in India.

Plums
A common food, with wide-ranging nutritional benefits

Pork
Pork is also a really good source of vitamin V12, key to help our nervous systems; and it also contains B6 and niacin.

Potatoes
Potatoes must be one of most undervalued foods. They play such a main role in so many traditional dishes, they are easy to grow and are in plentiful supply, they are cheap and come in lots of different varieties, and they can be cooked in so many different ways

Prunes
Unprepossessing but tasty and good for you

Pumpkin
Pumpkins are very tasty and versatile; with their sweet earthy taste they can be used in a range of great dishes from soups to pumpkin pie plus of course as a stand alone vegetable.

Quinoa
If you haven’t heard of quinoa you will do soon…it is the new hit food of 2016! And not surprising really, it seems to tick a great number of boxes thanks to high levels of protein, fibre, anti-inflammatory phytonutrients and lots of other good things.

Radishes
Most of us only add radishes to a salad because of their colour and nice crisp texture. Few of us would think, goodness we must have radish with our salad because of its nutritional value.

Rocket
Rocket is a very English leaf and was used in salads in Elizabethan times when its flowers, seed pods and seeds were often eaten as well.

Salmon
Versatile, delicious, and packed full of goodness

Sardines
For many of us, sardines were a staple in our childhood when so many of the modern everyday exotic foods were unobtainable.

Scallops
Scallops are on many British menus these days and are often chosen for their delicate flavour, sometimes enhanced with special sauces.

Sea Bass
Say you like Sea Bass and it doesn’t really mean a lot. This is because Sea Bass is a general name used to cover lots of different fish which can make it very confusing.

Seaweed
Incredibly healthy but rarely bought.

Spelt
There has been a recent trend towards Spelt and today many people are choosing Spelt products over traditional flour ingredients.

Spelt
Despite its growing popularity, many people still know very little about spelt, what it is and how to use it.

Strawberries
There is more reason for us all to love strawberries apart from their fabulous flavour. Strawberries are a nutritional powerhouse! 

Sweetcorn
Here in the UK we are at the peak season for sweetcorn which should be ripening between mid August and mid September.

Sweet potatoes
They are not only incredibly versatile and delicious, sweet potatoes also contain some great nutrients.

Sugarsnap Peas
They are not only incredibly versatile and delicious, sweet potatoes also contain some great nutrients.

Tofu
This specialised food comes from the far east where it has been used in a variety of dishes for centuries

Tomatoes
Tomatoes, the dramatic health food that was once thought poisonous!

Turkey
Most of us know that the turkey is a large bird, but the species we know today has come from one specific bird, the Meleagris gallopavo or wild turkey, that is native to the forests of north America.

Venison
Venison meat is a lean red meat with a stronger more gamey flavour than beef.

Walnuts
Many people who say they really don’t eat nuts also mention that the one nut they quite like is the walnut.

Yoghurt
However you spell yoghurt or yogurt, it is undeniably a healthy food that can be a very beneficial addition to our diet.

Natural Remedy of the Month

An A-Z listing of Natural Rememedies.

Algae - a green surprise!
New research from Japan shows that green algae can help fight major diseases

Aloe Vera
Aloe Vera is hailed as one of nature's most generous gifts that can help in the widest range of problems..

Anise or Aniseed
Aniseed has a very definite flavour , one of those tastes you either love or hate

Chamomile

The pretty chamomile plant, or chamomilla recutita, seems to have lots of great benefits.


Cloves

Clove has been attributed with many more properties than just adding flavour and many claim it should be in every medicine cabinet for use as a pain reliever, digestive aid and warming stimulant.

Coriander  
You can use the leaves as well as the seeds of coriander in many tasty recipes. It is also believed to have a number of health benefits.

Dandelions
Dandelions are mainly used to help detoxify the system, the root especially is said to encourage the steady elimination of toxins from the body

Fenugreek
Fenugreek is one of those herbs that we have probably heard of but don’t really know much about.

Flaxseed

Flaxseed has been around for more than 4,000 years, it was even known in the days of Hippocrates for its health benefits.

Frankincense
Many people claim a variety of health benefits from the essential oils of frankincense

Mint

Mint is rich in Vitamins A and C and also contains smaller amounts of Vitamin B2.

Rose hip

Rosemary
It has been known for a long time that this wonderfully flavoured herb can offer a range of great health benefits.

St John's Wort

This short, yellow flowering plant has played a major part in medicine for hundreds of years.

Turmeric

Watercress

The trouble with watercress is that we tend to use it as a salad food.

More Health Food Articles:

Hawthorn Berries
3 supplements to support health when travelling
Relief of backache, rheumatic or muscular pain, and general aches and pains in the muscles and joints.
Lighter Life for Fred
Health Perception
Is Maca the ‘new Ginseng’?

Ginseng – herb or drug?
Secrets of Manuka honey

Are you eating properly?


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