Click here to print this page

Planning Retirement Online

Food of the month - Sugarsnap Peas

January 2016

SNAP TO IT FOR THE NEW YEAR!

January is the time of New Year resolutions, a month when many of us decide to eat more healthily, to try and reduce our alcohol intake and often to start a new fitness campaign after the excesses of Christmas celebrations.

But a new healthier regime doesn't have to be all about uninteresting salads- there are lots of foods out there that are surprisingly good for us and nice to eat as well.

Sugarsnap peas, for example, are often ignored in special diets, but in fact they are a great way to add colour and flavour to food and also bring good nutrition into your meal plans.

Previous Health Foods of the Month...

Turkey

Brussels Sprouts

Duck


 

Diet & Supplements Index

Waitrose Recipes

These peas are not a natural plant, but come from Idaho in America after Chinese snow peas were crossed with a mutant shell pea plant. Interesting they are botanically a fruit as they contain seeds and develop from the ovary, but here in the UK we usually use them as a vegetable.

Sugarsnaps, like other peas, are pod fruits, but with sugar snap peas the pod is less fibrous and edible when young. They do not have a membrane and the pods do not open when they are ripe. Sometimes people become confused between sugarsnap peas and mangetout; and technically the name mangetout can cover sugarsnap peas as well; although here in the UK they usually refer to the very flat pods while sugarsnaps are more rounded and often contain three to eight small peas.

One of the health benefits of sugarsnap peas is their high level of vitamin C. Sugarsnap peas contain around 60 milligrams of vitamin C per 100 gram serving, a useful amount to help with all the benefits this vitamin brings, including boosting immunity levels, helping wound healing and aiding the production of collagen.

Sugarsnaps also contain vitamin A, that essential antioxidant vitamin which helps to keep connective strong and helps eyesight among its benefits. The peas also contain moderate amount of multiple B vitamins including pantothenic acid and thiamine.

They even contain 25 micrograms of vitamin K in a 100 gram serving; an essential vitamin known for its ability to promote blood clotting.

But there is more in these simple looking peas, sugarsnaps contain useful levels of both iron and manganese minerals; for instance a 100 gram serving offers 26 per cent of the daily recommended value of iron.

Plus sugarsnaps offer useful levels of fibre.

All round these innocuous little green pods can actually be a fabulous addition to any diet and can be eaten raw as a snack which gives them even greater appeal to those of us who feel we need to cut down after rather overdoing the Christmas eating!!

 


Bookmark This Share on Facebook Receive more like this

 

Latest Articles:

Health food of the month - Haggis

haggis

Most people have heard of haggis; the traditional Scottish dish that is closely associated with Burns night in January each year. But what exactly is a haggis and is it good for you?

AXA Health: 7 common causes of swollen ankles and how they can be treated

healthy feet and ankles with smiley faces on the bottom

Swollen ankles can be unsightly, uncomfortable and can cause some distress. Getting to the bottom of what’s causing the swelling is important in order to treat the problem effectively.

Sit up straight and walk tall! Posture is important!

woman in pain holding her lower back

One thing so many people suffer from as they get older is poor posture. For those lucky enough not to have any back pain, slouching is still a really bad idea that can be setting up problems for the future.

more

Can the NHS survive?

doctor checking patient's blood pressure

Most of us have lived all our lives with the National Health Service and it can be a surprise to realise that until it was introduced some people simply couldn’t afford medical treatment. Can you imagine what that would be like?

Back to LaterLife Health Section

Visit our Pre-retirement Courses section here on laterlife or our dedicated Retirement Courses site

Bookmark


Advertise on laterlife.com



LaterLife Travel Insurance in Association with Avanti