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Art Masterclass   

                           February 2009

 

Each month laterlife.com presents a feature from either The Artist or its sister publication, Leisure Painter.           

Art masterclass      

from The Artist, the monthly magazine for amateur and semi-professional painters, giving practical instruction in painting and drawing in watercolour, pastels and oils, as well as news of art events, exhibitions and competitions open to leisure artists; www.theartistmagazine.co.uk  

 


This Month:

Learn to develop your skills with oil pastels and create texture and interest in your paintings


Demonstration: George on the Allotment

 

YOU WILL NEED

Sennelier Oil Pastels
French ultramarine blue
Intense red
Pine green
Lemon yellow
George on the allotmentRoyal blue
Burnt umber
White

Flesh ochre
Yellow deep
Phthalo blue
Parma violet
Cobalt violet
Barite green

Neopastel
Light brown

photo

 

Step 1


Using the photograph of my local allotments (leftt) for reference, create a working sketch for your painting (see mine, below).



 






sketch

 

 

Transfer the scene to a piece of acrylic-primed medium white canvas and sketch the basic design loosely with a dark Neocolor I pastel.

Make a paper or tracing paper copy of your line drawing to use as a mask later.
 





 

 

step twoStep 2


With the drawing in place, rub French ultramarine blue, intense red, pine green, lemon yellow and royal blue into the surface. Taking your paper copy, carefully cut along the horizon, including the profile of the shed and George. Lay the bottom half onto the painting and block in French ultramarine blue and burnt umber into the upper background. As the paper is peeled away, the sharp prof ile of the shed and George is revealed. Enhance the background further using white, flesh ochre and yellow deep to make the light come from the right-hand side.

 

 

step 3Step 3


Taking your paper copy, carefully cut along the horizon, including the profile of the shed and George. Lay the bottom half onto the painting and block in French ultramarine blue and burnt umber into the upper background. As the paper is peeled away, the sharp profile of the shed and George is revealed. Enhance the background further using white, flesh ochre and yellow deep to make the light come from the right-hand side.



 

 

Step 4


step fourUsing the scalpel, cut the paper copy of the shed into large sections; this will allow you to work over different parts of the shed but maintain the sharp edges. Cut out the side of the shed that faces the sun.

Cut notches at the approximate spacing of the boards, then drag light brown Neopastel over the surface. The mask prevents the pastel from going where you don’t want it to. Tackle the roof in a similar way.

For the rest of the painting, block in lots of loose and bright colour. As well as applying the Sennelier colours already mentioned, add phthalo blue, Parma violet, cobalt violet and barite green. When applied, mash them together with the Colour Shaper.
 

 

George on the Allotment, oil pastel on canvas sheet, Step 5


Now for the fun part! Scrape out the pea sticks and trellis with a palette knife, revealing the colours underneath in a sgraffito effect. Finish the shed using the mask again (right) and give George some highlights and a basket. His skin tones are achieved using flesh ochre. Dash in the sweet peas and bean flowers randomly using Parma violet, cobalt violet, white and intense red. Create the spiky flowers using yellow deep.
Finally, put a little more definition into the red pump in the foreground.



Further information on the tools and techniques used in this demonstration may be found in the February 2009 issue of Leisure Painter.   For further articles on oil pastel techniques click here.


 


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