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Planning Retirement Online


Leisure Painter        October 2005

                                          

Each month laterlife.com presents a feature from either The Artist or its sister publication, Leisure Painter.

Leisure Painter inspires, guides and encourages beginners and improvers with step-by-step instruction, as well as general advice on ways to develop and progress. Experienced and popular tutors set projects, describe their own working methods and offer helpful tips and ideas

 

 

Let's Start with Art

This month:

A pair of budgerigars in coloured pencil

by Trudy Friend

 

 

 

 

  • To create a relationship between two birds on a bough.

  • To indicate form by the depiction of pattern.
     

 

two budgerigars on a bough 

Paper

  • Cartridge drawing paper 110gsm for the initial sketch

  • Saunders waterford 190 gsm HP paper for final artwork


Colours

  • Coloured pencils: Derwent Studio range

  • Deep cadmium

  • Golden brown

  • Bronze

  • Grass green

  • Mineral green

  • Light blue

  • Cobalt blue

  • Blue grey

  • Gunmetal

  • Black
     

 

  • The initial drawing was used to ensure that both heads were not placed at the same level. They were positioned in a way that allowed an interesting negative shape to appear between the two forms. I then looked for another (small) negative shape to add interest (see in the blue area in Figure 1).
     


 

  • The images were transferred from the cartridge paper to the HP surface by placing the drawing against a window with the HP paper over the top, and tracing each bird using the relevant colours.

  • I used two main methods of applying colour: a) gentle blocking in the main hues; and b) overlaying contoured pattern for the rows of feathers.

  • Small zig-zag applications of the contoured pattern areas contrast with the longer strokes needed to depict wing and tail feathers.
     

 
Figure 1



Step 1

 

The two birds were initially drawn on cartridge paper. Consideration was given to their relationship and the use of an important negative shape that separates them. The horizontal ‘guideline’ placed above the blue bird ensured that the heads would be on different levels.

Step 2

 

I have indicated the ‘open negative’ shape (not enclosed at the top) and a smaller ‘closed negative shape between the wing feathers, the bird’s body and the supporting branch in blue, as these are important considerations in a composition.
 

 

Figure 2

The two birds were initially drawn on cartridge paper.

Figure 1



Step 1

Colours relevant to each bird were used to trace them in position on the HP paper.

Step 2

Larger areas of colour were blocked in using gentle toning to establish variations in hue. On the green bird these comprised shades of green and yellow, and on the blue bird, shades of blue and blue grey. I allowed some white paper to remain untouched to indicate pale, highlighted areas.

Step 3

I then concentrated on the relationships between the eyes and bills, overlaying the intricate contoured pattern following the form of the heads.

 

Colours relevant to each bird were used to trace them in position on the HP paper.

 

Figure 2

Step 4

I have indicated specific shadow recess shapes between clumps of feathers that help to relate the birds to their support and anchor the forms.
 

 

Figure 3



Step 1

Budgies come in a variety of colours, and I was careful to choose two colours that were different yet connected in some way in order to create a unity between them – hence the yellow head feathers of the blue bird.

Step 2

Special care and attention was given to the bright little eyes and smooth delicate bills – the former with its strong contrast and the latter with subtle blending.

 

Budgies come in a variety of colours, and I was careful to choose two colours that were different yet connected in some way in order to create a unity between them – hence the yellow head feathers of the blue bird.

Figure 3

Step 3

To continue the theme of contrast and blending, the breast feathers were treated with careful, short strokes of the pencil, using a variety of gentle and firm pressure marks.
 

Step 4

Strong contrasts of black pattern on the other parts of the bird were then emphasised.

Step 5

Finally, all shadow recess areas were enhanced. Gentle shading was introduced to create texture on the bough and to anchor both the birds and the bough.
 

 

See their website:- www.leisurepainter.co.uk or Telephone 01580 763315

 

 

   

laterlife interest

The above article is part of the features section of laterlife.com called laterlife interest. laterlife interest contains a variety of articles of interest for visitors to laterlife.com written by a number of experienced and new journalists.

It includes both one off articles and also regular columns of a more specialist nature such as healthwise, reports from the REACH files, and a beauty section called looking good in later life.

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