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You can do IT in later life - 26

You can do IT is a regular feature of laterlife.com aimed at trying to help laterlife visitors make the most of Information Technology on or off the web.

Jackie Sherman who runs the You can do IT Question & Answer section is an IT trainer and author. Jackie has spent her career in education and specialises in teaching IT to adults. Her courses for adults include such topics as MS Office, the Internet, e-mail and basic web page authoring. Getting the most from your computer.jpg (5543 bytes)

Jackie has also written the two books shown here - you can find more details about these by clicking on the cover images above. Jackie has also been running a course specifically for over 50s.

 

Via laterlife.com Jackie aims to particularly help those new to IT and the web to build up knowledge and confidence, so no question is too basic. At the same time she will cover Q&As for the more experienced user. 

So if you would like to ask a question of Jackie, why not email her jackie@laterlife.com

or if you have discovered something which may be of interest to others in making the most of the web, then she would love to hear about that too jackie@laterlife.com


Via laterlife.com Jackie aims to particularly help those new to IT and the web to build up knowledge and confidence, so no question is too basic. At the same time she will cover Q&As for the more experienced user. 

So if you would like to ask a question of Jackie, why not email her jackie@laterlife.com

or if you have discovered something which may be of interest to others in making the most of the web, then she would love to hear about that too jackie@laterlife.com


As it’s getting towards Christmas, you may be planning to send cards to all your family and friends. If you’re sensible, you’ll be using your computer to keep up-to-date details of everyone in some kind of address book.  Here are two different methods you can use to do this.

 

 

 

Spreadsheet   

1.      Use a package such as Excel to set up your database. Type in as many headings (technically known as fields) as you can think of, so you can search by title, first name, surname etc. and then fill each row with the record of one person.     

family1.jpg (16905 bytes)
 

2.      Once the database becomes very large and you want to search for particular names or addresses, use one of the following search techniques. 

a.      Go to the Edit - Find menu option and type the word(s) you are looking for in the Find what box.  Click Find Next and the relevant cell should be selected.    

family2.jpg (16792 bytes)
 

b.      Select ALL the data including the headings and then go to Data - Filter - AutoFilter.  Small boxes will appear at the top of each column. Click the drop down arrow in the box to reveal each entry in that particular column. To display one set of entries - e.g. all those people living in Birmingham, or all the Smiths, select that choice with your mouse. Only relevant records will be displayed. When you have finished, return to the full database by clicking (All) in the list, or go to Data - Filter - Show All.

family3.jpg (15057 bytes)
 

c.      If your search is more complex, click (Custom).  Then pick the appropriate entries in the boxes for each category.      

family4.jpg (17363 bytes)
 

d.      For a simple search, just re-order your records.  Select all the data (if you haven’t yet set up a Filter) and go to Data - Sort.  In the first box, select which column you want to sort on and whether it is in alphabetical order (ascending) or not.  You can even sort on two or three categories - first by surname, then by first name and finally by age, postcode, country etc. etc.  Click OK and now you can quickly move to the appropriate block of records to find those addresses.   

family5.jpg (17424 bytes)

Database

1.      Create a table in a database package such as Access and enter each record in the usual way. (Setting up tables to be covered in a future issue.) It might look something like this:

family6.jpg (15539 bytes)

 

2.      Use the Edit - Find menu just as in Excel to locate a particular record.  However, only one category is searched at a time unless you ask the computer to search the entire table.  Click your mouse in any entry in the correct category first or change the entry in the Look in box.     

family7.jpg (11065 bytes)
 

3.      Re-order your database by clicking an entry in the appropriate column (e.g. click a Smith to re-order by Surname) and click the A-Z button on the toolbar.

4.      Filter out records to leave just the appropriate details.  Click any example of the entries you want to find (e.g. Birmingham to locate all relatives living here) and then click the Filter by Selection button.  All other records will be temporarily hidden.  Return to the full database by clicking Apply/Remove Filter (the light cone button).

family8.jpg (16569 bytes)
 

5.      To carry out a more sophisticated search, click the Filter by Form button and select appropriate details or type in your own.  Then click the Apply/Remove Filter button.     

family9.jpg (7976 bytes)
 

6.      Finally, for a search you can save and repeat in future, design a Query.  Close the table, click the Query tab in the Database window and choose to create it in Design View.  Select the table on which to base your search and close the Show Table box.  Then decide which categories you want to view (you don’t have to see all details and may only want e.g. surname and postcode).  Drag the names of these categories from the small list to the rows below, or double click each name. Type in the details you are searching for in the appropriate column on the Criteria row and click Run.

    

family10.jpg (23331 bytes)
 

Just the relevant record details should be displayed and you can save this search with an appropriate name.  When you add more people to your database, running this query will include new Smith members.

 family11.jpg (8850 bytes)

                                                      

    

Specifically written for UK Web users, this book will give you everything you'll need to know to put the Internet to work for you

 

HTML 4 features clear and concise instructions   with well-captioned illustrations and screenshots that show both the source code and the resulting effect on the Web page

 

'Weaving the Web' is a personal account by Tim Berners-Lee, the creator of the World Wide Web, about how the Web came to be, and where the World Wide Web is going in the future.This is a man who invented the future, created something which one day will be bigger than all the other industries on earth!

  

     This book is an excellent reference book for Windows XP. It will suit both the novice seeking to understand the basics of an operating system, as well as the intermediate and expert users who have upgraded from other operating systems.

      This book will help you when you've got the machine into your home and you need to know what to do next. Starting with the process of unpacking the box and plugging in all the cables, this book shows you what to do with your new machine.

     

      It would be hard to find a book that covers every thing about the Web but this one focuses on the basic knowledge required to get some Web pages together.

 

View previous editions of YoucandoIT for more useful Questions and Answers


Click on a book or magazine image above or below to see full details.

                                

              


For a wealth of books on the web and IT generally, visit Amazon and under the books section select Computers and Internet.

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