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Planning Retirement Online


You can do IT in later life -

You can do IT is a regular feature of laterlife.com aimed at trying to help laterlife visitors make the most of Information Technology on or off the web.

Jackie Sherman who runs the You can do IT Question & Answer section is an IT trainer and author. Jackie has spent her career in education and specialises in teaching IT to adults. Her courses for adults include such topics as MS Office, the Internet, e-mail and basic web page authoring. Getting the most from your computer.jpg (5543 bytes)

Jackie has also written the two books shown here - you can find more details about these by clicking on the cover images above. Jackie has also been running a course specifically for over 50s.

 

Via laterlife.com Jackie aims to particularly help those new to IT and the web to build up knowledge and confidence, so no question is too basic. At the same time she will cover Q&As for the more experienced user. 

So if you would like to ask a question of Jackie, why not email her jackie@laterlife.com

or if you have discovered something which may be of interest to others in making the most of the web, then she would love to hear about that too jackie@laterlife.com


Via laterlife.com Jackie aims to particularly help those new to IT and the web to build up knowledge and confidence, so no question is too basic. At the same time she will cover Q&As for the more experienced user. 

So if you would like to ask a question of Jackie, why not email her jackie@laterlife.com

or if you have discovered something which may be of interest to others in making the most of the web, then she would love to hear about that too jackie@laterlife.com


You can do IT - Edition 28

If you use the Internet to do some of your shopping, and you like the idea of saving money, perhaps it’s time you thought about using an on-line auction. This is where people like you and me sell goods they no longer want, so that it works rather like an enormous, in-door car boot sale. 

One of the most well-known sites is www.eBay.co.uk  I recently used it to buy an electronic PDA (hand-held computer) that was out-of-date and therefore couldn’t be bought through the usual channels. As I saved about 100 and had no problems, I thought you might like to know what is involved. 

When you visit the site, you will find almost anything you could ever want to buy, with a link to UK-only sellers if you don’t want the added hassle of purchasing from abroad. Some of the items for sale include: designer clothes, antiques, dolls houses, films, pottery, watches, glass, tickets and jewellery.

Here is my step-by-step guide to buying safely:

  • Decide on the item you want to buy and do your research. Look on the Internet or in magazines to find out the going price for this or similar items, new and second-hand, and decide on the maximum you will spend, taking into account any wear and tear or lack of accessories.

  • Register on eBay free so that you are able to buy.

  • Use the search box to produce a list of sellers offering your particular item.  Click on any in the list to read the details. If there aren’t many - it’s probably best to avoid that seller as you won’t know what is included in the price.  (Although you can e-mail the seller with questions, we found we never got answers in time.)

  • If you are lucky, they may be offering a Buy Now option. If it seems a reasonable price - click the link and save yourself the bother of taking part in the auction. Once agreed - the item will be yours.

  • If you can only bid, put the maximum you are willing to spend in the box.  The system will enter a low bid just a few s higher than the one already in,  and will keep upping your bid if other people outdo it. The auction stops for you when your maximum is reached and you are outbid - or no-one else offers more and you are the winner.

  • You will see that each auction has a time limit. The nearer you are to the deadline, the more likely your bid is to succeed, but there are thousands of people who enjoy bidding at the last minute, so you are never sure of a purchase until the deadline has passed.

  • If you are outbid - and this can happen at any time of the day or night - you will be sent an e-mail. Likewise, you will be told if your bid was successful.

  • To buy the item, use your credit card (for security) and the systems they offer such as PayPal or BillPay. You will be told how to register to use these and which systems your seller prefers.  

  • eBay should send the seller your details as he/she is responsible for sending you the item, but you may want to e-mail yourself with any details.

  • You should receive your purchase in a few days and can then click the link you are given to rate his/her behaviour and reliability. Keep relationships polite as they can also rate you, and you don’t want a poor rating if you go in for any future auctions!

  • I had no trouble at all, but on the very rare occasions when goods don’t arrive or are faulty, you will need to contact your bank and eBay to try to get a refund.

  • As it’s the Internet and a number of rogues prey on normal users, don’t spend vast sums until you are very confident you know what you are doing. If you can afford the risk, you may find that it is an excellent way to buy good quality, second-hand goods from home.


                                                     

View previous editions of YoucandoIT for more useful Questions and Answers


Click on a book or magazine image above or below to see full details.

                                

              


For a wealth of books on the web and IT generally, visit Amazon and under the books section select Computers and Internet.

Don't forget to visit the general laterlife features section called laterlife interest


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