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Planning Retirement Online


You can do IT in later life - 29

You can do IT is a regular feature of laterlife.com aimed at trying to help laterlife visitors make the most of Information Technology on or off the web.

Jackie Sherman who runs the You can do IT Question & Answer section is an IT trainer and author. Jackie has spent her career in education and specialises in teaching IT to adults. Her courses for adults include such topics as MS Office, the Internet, e-mail and basic web page authoring. Getting the most from your computer.jpg (5543 bytes)

Jackie has also written the two books shown here - you can find more details about these by clicking on the cover images above. Jackie has also been running a course specifically for over 50s.

 

Via laterlife.com Jackie aims to particularly help those new to IT and the web to build up knowledge and confidence, so no question is too basic. At the same time she will cover Q&As for the more experienced user. 

So if you would like to ask a question of Jackie, why not email her jackie@laterlife.com

or if you have discovered something which may be of interest to others in making the most of the web, then she would love to hear about that too jackie@laterlife.com


Via laterlife.com Jackie aims to particularly help those new to IT and the web to build up knowledge and confidence, so no question is too basic. At the same time she will cover Q&As for the more experienced user. 

So if you would like to ask a question of Jackie, why not email her jackie@laterlife.com

or if you have discovered something which may be of interest to others in making the most of the web, then she would love to hear about that too jackie@laterlife.com


Working with your machine 

This month, I am going to help you take more control of your computer.

On the Desktop: When you double-click or select and press Enter to open My Computer, you have a bird’s eye view of the contents of your machine. You will see icons for the drives (the locations of your various disks), and the folders where you save work and programs and which contain details of other parts such as your printer and dial-up connection to the internet.

Opening any of these will allow you to search through your entire machine.    

 

From Windows 2000 onwards, you will have a link to My Documents showing in the window, or you can open your Local Disk to find this folder. Inside will be any files you have saved and it is a quick way to view the contents and find a file you are looking for.

Reorganizing: The display of files and folders can be varied. Do you want to see a list, large or small icons or full details of the contents? Change the appearance by selecting from the View menu. 

If you want to group your files in different ways, select View - Arrange Icons and group by type, name, size or date.  This is helpful if searching for files produced recently or of a particular type.    

 

  Shows details of files grouped by type

       
Association:  If a file opens in the wrong application e.g. a picture opens in Paint and you want to use Kodak Imaging software, you can change the program with which it is associated. 

1.  Select the file

2.  Hold the Shift key as you right-click to open a menu that offers Open with.   

  

3.  Select this option to display a list of all programs in your computer.

4.  Scroll down until you find the correct program, click OK and it will open.

5.  Set this program as the default (automatic choice) by clicking in the little box below the list.         

Finding a File:  It is so easy to forgot where you saved work, so use the Search facility to find it again.  Find this on the Start - Find - Files and Folders menu.

Although your search box may look different from the one shown, you will always need to amend two boxes:  the Name and Location. You may also have an Advanced tab to allow you to enter dates, in case you saved your work between certain days and that’s all you remember. 

Name:  Enter as much of the name as you can, and/or the file type (Word documents end .doc, Excel files end .xls, Paint images end .bmp etc). Use the * symbol for unknown letters.  For example, if looking for a Word document named Annual Report, you can type any combination e.g.

Ann*.doc  

*Rep*.doc  

*.doc   (this will find ALL Word documents) or

Annual*

Location:  Drop down the list or click Browse to find the lowest level of drive or folder you know might contain the file. Then click Find Now.

Any files found during the search with similar names will be displayed below the Find box and you can double click them to open.    

Shortcuts:  If you often use a particular program or file, make a shortcut to it on your desktop for future use.  Right-click it the open window when it is Restored (to reveal the Desktop behind). Drag it onto the desktop and then select Create shortcut here.   

 


                                                     

View previous editions of YoucandoIT for more useful Questions and Answers


Click on a book or magazine image above or below to see full details.

                                

              


For a wealth of books on the web and IT generally, visit Amazon and under the books section select Computers and Internet.

Don't forget to visit the general laterlife features section called laterlife interest


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