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Planning Retirement Online


You can do IT in later life - 32

You can do IT is a regular feature of laterlife.com aimed at trying to help laterlife visitors make the most of Information Technology on or off the web.

Jackie Sherman who runs the You can do IT Question & Answer section is an IT trainer and author. Jackie has spent her career in education and specialises in teaching IT to adults. Her courses for adults include such topics as MS Office, the Internet, e-mail and basic web page authoring. Getting the most from your computer.jpg (5543 bytes)

Jackie has also written the two books shown here - you can find more details about these by clicking on the cover images above. Jackie has also been running a course specifically for over 50s.

 

Via laterlife.com Jackie aims to particularly help those new to IT and the web to build up knowledge and confidence, so no question is too basic. At the same time she will cover Q&As for the more experienced user. 

So if you would like to ask a question of Jackie, why not email her jackie@laterlife.com

or if you have discovered something which may be of interest to others in making the most of the web, then she would love to hear about that too jackie@laterlife.com



Via laterlife.com Jackie aims to particularly help those new to IT and the web to build up knowledge and confidence, so no question is too basic. At the same time she will cover Q&As for the more experienced user. 

So if you would like to ask a question of Jackie, why not email her jackie@laterlife.com

or if you have discovered something which may be of interest to others in making the most of the web, then she would love to hear about that too jackie@laterlife.com


 

Q:  Is there any way to keep small sections of text available quickly, rather than having to keep opening up long documents to refer to them?   

A:  I can think of two, quite different methods, depending on the software you have on your machine.  Both items can be deleted when you have finished with them by selecting and pressing your Delete key.

            a.  If you open a word processed document but keep the window “restored” so that you can see part of the desktop behind, you can select a chunk of text with the mouse and then drag it onto the desktop.  This is known as a “scrap” and can be double-clicked to open into its own window for reference or to copy.

            b.  For anyone using Microsoft Outlook, there is a Notes feature.  These are like post-its.  Open a new note, write in your block of text (or paste it from a long document) and then, with the window restored, drag the note onto the desktop.  As with scraps, double click to read the entry.


Q:  I now have a brand new scanner and can scan in pictures, but don’t know how to get them into a publication or send them via e-mail. Can you advise?  

A:  For copying into Publisher or another DTP application, select the open picture in the scanner window on screen - there may be a menu option or use a selecting objects arrow pointer - and then click Copy (or go to Edit - Copy).  Many image editors will have different selection tools available from a toolbar or Tools menu, so you can draw round particular parts of the picture and only copy those across.

Open your publication, click Paste and then treat the picture that appears like any other object e.g. resize or move it around the page.

Scanners often create images as TIFF files, but you can save them in any form. I would suggest for emailing, it is best to save them as JPEG files, so simply use the File - Save As menu option  to save your picture in this form. To email, locate the saved picture using Explorer or from the desktop by opening e.g. My Documents, and right-click. One option is usually Send To.. and you need to pick Mail Recipient.  Wait a couple of seconds and you should see an open New Message window with your picture file already attached. Complete the message and send it as normal.  


Q:  I am thinking of buying a new computer which will have Windows XP installed and will be buying Office XP software.  How different are these from earlier versions?

A:  Having just bought an XP machine, I am delighted to say that very little has changed.  You will find that playing music and DVDs etc is made much easier and pleasanter, and the Start menu works very slightly differently as you can “pin” useful programs onto it, but in the main it is only superficial differences. One thing I have liked about the software is a new “Task Pane” that pops up alongside the main window, offering shortcuts and previews of various features such as font styles, publication layouts, items copied into the Clipboard and slide designs in PowerPoint. You can close this at any time with the usual X close button, but it often reappears when you start a new activity.

For anyone moving from Windows 98 (but available in Windows 2000), you also have an easier way to manage files as you can go between My Document filing to the Explorer 2-pane layout simply by clicking a toolbar button labelled Folders, and the Start - Search facility seems more user-friendly.  

A note to readers - do send your XP questions, so the column can give you up-to-date help and advice as well as meet the needs of readers with older systems.


                     

View previous editions of YoucandoIT for more useful Questions and Answers


Click on a book or magazine image above or below to see full details.

                                

              


For a wealth of books on the web and IT generally, visit Amazon and under the books section select Computers and Internet.

 

Don't forget to visit the general laterlife features section called laterlife interest


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