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Planning Retirement Online

Ageing Traveller Series

The Ageing Traveller series is written by Rose Howell, who has been traveling the world for over 40 years, beginning with New Zealand and then the ‘Hippy trail’ in the 70’s. Her travels have taken her to; Asia, Middle East, UK, Europe, Africa, South America, USA, Canada, China and the Pacific Islands. In total she has visited 67 countries plus all the states of Australia except Western Australia, and her goal is to make the century club. Her passion for travel is documented on her website www.ageing-hipsters-travel.com.

Click here to find out more about Rose.

How To Choose A Cabin On A Cruise

When deciding on a cruise, many of us trust the travel agent and the cruise line to give us the best cabin per price. But should we leave it up to them to decide for us. I for one would want to know what I am getting. I don’t want to embark on a cruise and find I have no view and it is noisy and so far away from everything that I need ear plugs and a vehicle to get to. So here are some tips I have researched on how to choose the cabin that will suit your needs.


1. Inside or outside?

Inside cabins are ideal if you don’t plan to spend a lot of time in your room and they are more economical. Some ships have windows overlooking interior arcades or ‘virtual windows’ showing outside views.
Outside cabins have windows or portholes that let in the natural light and have views (mostly of the ocean). Balcony cabins have natural light, great views and a private place to sit and relax. Suites give all the above plus plenty of room (at a price).

2. Beware who may be watching

On some ships the lower decks jut out so people in cabins above and on public decks have a full view of balconies below. The crew also get a good view. Best not be doing anything private because you will be sprung.

3. When motion is a problem

If you tend to feel ill from motion, then pick a midship cabin on a lower deck as these have less motion than those at the front or higher decks. If motion isn’t a problem, higher decks have grander views when entering ports or scenic cruising.

4. Noise

Try not to locate close to the kids club unless you love the sound of youngsters having fun. Check out what is directly above your cabin choice. Nightclubs, basketball courts, pool etc. All of these can get noisy and it may continue on through to the wee hours of the morning.
Cabins to the front or rear of the ship may be noisy due to the engine and anchors being close by.

5. Mobility

Decide where you will spend most of your time. Is it near the sundeck, theatre, show room or the buffet restaurant? You don’t want to be too far away from your main interests. Remember some of these ships are huge and it could take a bit of a trek to get to where you want to be. So if mobility is a problem, then you may even need to be near a lift or escalator, even though they also can be noisy.

6. Obstructed views

Make sure there are not lifeboats or other equipment blocking your views. However you could push for a discount if there is. Check your itinerary and make sure your room has the right view when coming into port, you don’t want to only see the ocean.

Other tips when cruising

Cruise lines run loyalty programs to reward repeat guests. They usually run on tier systems reflecting the numbers of days at sea.
These tiers usually are reflected by the color of your complimentary lapel pin, allowing staff to instantly recognise regular cruisers and give you special attention.
  • Lower tiers start off with newsletters and alerts of special deals.
  • Higher tiers offer exclusive receptions hosted by captain and officers, free meals in specialty restaurants, nibbles, priority check in, priority discounts, free laundry, free internet, upgrades, free dinners, seating at theatre shows and much more, even free cruises.

Passengers are rewarded for their loyalty to the Cruise Line.
They receive a collectable lapel pin plus the chance of the ‘THE’ Gold envelope in your room inviting you to dine with the captain.



Rose Howell Biography

Rose has been traveling the world for over 40 years, beginning with New Zealand and then the ‘Hippy trail’ in the 70’s. Her travels have taken her to; Asia, Middle East, UK, Europe, Africa, South America, USA, Canada, China and the Pacific Islands. In total she has visited 67 countries plus all the states of Australia except Western Australia, and her goal is to make the century club.
She has taken all kinds of transport and accommodation from budget to luxury. She has travelled through war zones, survived a bus accident in the Andes and visited areas that are no longer available to tourists, such as the Khyber Pass and Bamiyan Statues in Afghanistan.

Rose wants to inspire others to travel and offers free advice to all travellers in particular those who are embarking on their first travel experience. She has a passion for travel and since retiring from an Adult teaching position with TafeSA, has recently resumed clocking up kilometres interstate and overseas.
Her daughters have inherited the travel bug from their parents. The eldest daughter is a travel journalist/documentary maker based in a beautiful area called ‘Byron Bay’ in New South Wales and with her husband, has two globetrotting toddlers who at the age of 5 and 2 also love to travel. Her youngest daughter and fiancé have recently returned from 2 years working and traveling in the UK and Europe. They have only been home a couple of months and are already getting restless. Oh the travel bug!!!!

Rose has developed a website for the over 50 traveller www.ageing-hipsters-travel.com where you can access for free all her advice and past and present stories. You can add stories of your own too.

She also has a blog on:
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